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Technology makes it possible for a paralyzed man to just think and the message is sent automatically. The man from Australia tweeted aaaq.

A paralyzed person in Australia has become the first person to tweet a message through direct thought. In fact, this has been made possible by a brain implant the size of a paper clip. 62 years living in Australia Philip O’Keefe He has suffered from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) for seven years, so he cannot move his upper limbs. He tweeted: “No more keystrokes (keyboard typing or voices required, just created this tweet with it in mind. #helloworldbci.”

He was diagnosed with a form of motor neuron disease (ALS) in 2015, and on December 23, he successfully converted his direct thought into text using the Stantrod Brain Computer Interface (BCI). Philip used the Twitter handle of Synchron CEO Thomas Oxley to send the message.

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The use of the brain will facilitate the work.
The ‘Stentrod’ brain-computer interface created by Synchron, a California-based neurovascular medicine and bioelectronics company, allows people like Philip O’Keefe to work on computers using only their brains.

Oxley reported that patients using Stantrod had a click accuracy of 93%. They can type 14 to 20 characters per minute. The special thing is that this implant is done through the jugular vein, so there is no need for surgery on the brain.

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O’Keefe explains: “When I first heard about this technique, I knew how much freedom it could give me. The system is amazing, it’s like learning to ride a bike: it takes practice, but once you ride, it becomes second nature. Now I only think where to click, right after banking, shopping and sending emails become easy.

Tags: portable gadgets, Technology news, hindi tech news

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